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Please utilize the freely available mindfulness recordings on this page to continue to develop your practice as part of our series for Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT).

 

The Raisin Exercise is a practice in mindful eating that can be done with a raisin or any other food. This exercise can be a good place to start if you are new or newer to mindfulness practice.

The Body Scan is a practice in focusing attention over a sustained period of time, which can improve concentration, calmness, flexibility, and mindfulness. Increasing awareness of your body can also help you to better manage emotions.

The Sitting Meditation is a basic mindfulness of the breath practice that is good if you are just learning how to practice mindfulness or don't have a lot of time. It's a great way to start the day in the morning, or a nice way to take a break during a stressful or busy workday.

This is a great practice to use to check in with yourself during the day and to step out of automatic pilot. With practice, it can help with acceptance of the present moment, recognition that things are always changing, and stopping rumination.

This mindful stretching exercise may be a different approach to movement than you are used to and allows you to attend to your body in a different way, particularly if you do or have done yoga before. Attending to the body sensations of stretching and movement can serve as a bridge to this moment, and is something you can practice in any type of movement you do.

The Twenty Minute Sitting Meditation is a sitting practice that allows for opportunities to nonjudgmentally notice where the mind has gone, to bring awareness to the body as a whole, to try sitting with physical sensations that may be uncomfortable, and to use the breath as a way to reconnect to this moment and feel grounded.

The Mindful Walking practice is another way to bring a new awareness to everyday movement and get out of automatic pilot. You can practice it anywhere, and experiment with different speeds and directions.

The Forty Minute Sitting Meditation presents a range of ways to focus attention. It helps to start noticing aversion to an experience, the urge to avoid particular thoughts, and the link between thoughts and emotions. It allows for practice sitting with whatever comes and goes, practice relating to your experience with clarity and directness, and an opportunity to stop struggling and simply be present with various experiences.

The Sitting With Difficulty mindfulness recording allows for practice building up tolerance and exposure to bodily tension related to situations. Over time it can allow you to manage something that feels unmanageable and increase connectedness. It is easier to work with physical sensations and emotions than thoughts, as thinking can become exhausting.